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Happy Thanksgiving from CureSearch

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Every Now

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Every 40 minutes a child is diagnosed with cancer. That’s 36 children today, tomorrow, and every day after that. The search for cures is happening now. Every Now. Will you help?

CureSearch is funding research that will solve the field’s most challenging problems. To help find cures now. Every Now.

The big issues: One out of 5 children diagnosed with cancer dies. 60% of those who survive suffer late effects from their treatment, including secondary cancers. The pace at which research must move to find cures and less toxic treatments needs to increase. Novel research needs funding and unwavering support.

Small steps forward: For 36 days, until the first of the New Year, we ask you to take our challenges. Nothing complicated, just small actions you can take to support the children diagnosed every day, which is big.

Together, we can make the most of Every Now

Invite your friends & family, and their friends & family to take today’s challenge!

Visit CureSearch.org/EveryNow to donate, participate, and help to grow the community of those searching for cures Every Now.

Help CureSearch Raise $10,000

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Forming a Caring Group to Support Family

CureSearch for Children’s Cancer is pleased to offer a webinar for parents and caregivers of children with cancer. This webinar will be presented by medical professionals specializing in the webinar’s topic. These webinars were made possible by a grant from American Legion Child Welfare Foundation.

Join CureSearch on November 20 at 7:00 pm EST to learn more about forming a caring group to support family. This webinar will help you understand why you might need a little extra help from friends and family during the treatment of your child’s cancer. Using video, slides, and discussion, presenters will share a model developed to organize the help of friends and family, including a step-by-step plan to use the power of a community in a way that best addresses the needs your family while treatment takes place.

Click here to register

Meet the Children: Bekah Freeman

Bekah Freeman

When Bekah was 12 years old, she was diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Though her journey has been long and hard, she has never let cancer get in the way of enjoying life.

After her diagnosis, her family moved to Alabama so that Bekah could receive the best possible treatment and be closer to their extended family. Due to her treatment, Bekah wasn’t able to attend school and was thrust into a world where her only friends were the ones she met at the hospital. Bekah had 13 months of intense chemotherapy which left her with long-term side effects such as hearing loss, short term memory loss, and kidney and heart function concerns that will need to be monitored for the rest of her life. Her treatment required she have her knee replaced, and due to complications with the replacement, Bekah later had her entire leg amputated. Despite all of this, Bekah has never felt limited in what she could accomplish.

The treatment process was very isolating for Bekah. She didn’t meet very many friends in her new town, and those she did meet couldn’t understand what she had been through. She felt that people only though of her as the “cancer girl.” Luckily, she was given the opportunity to attend a cancer camp where she met others with similar experiences to hers. Bekah found solace in her new cancer camp friends, and they helped her come out of her shell and feel comfortable being the bald girl. When Bekah started college, she worked hard to make sure that her friends knew about her past, but that it did not affect how they treated her.

Read more…

Overcoming Resistance in High Risk Medulloblastoma

William Weiss

A team of international researchers led by William Weiss, MD, PhD at the University of California, San Francisco, has been awarded a $1.88 million grant by CureSearch to investigate their hypothesis that drugs that reprogram (normalize) the epigenome, will block the inappropriate activation or silencing of DNA, thus normalizing gene expression. If this occurs, it will lead to improved outcomes for patients who do not respond to treatment.

Brain tumors are the leading cause of death from cancer in children, and medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain cancer. Patients with high-risk medulloblastoma are particularly resistant to the treatments that currently exist. Researchers have identified mutations (changes) in genes not thought to cause cancer. These genes regulate the “epigenetic state” of the cell, and mutations in them inappropriately lead cells to express genes that should normally be silenced, or silence genes that should normally be expressed. The inappropriate expressing and silencing of these genes in high-risk medulloblastoma may cause the cancer to resist the treatments that are currently available.

A team of international researchers led by William Weiss, MD, PhD at the University of California, San Francisco, has been awarded a $1.88 million grant by CureSearch to investigate their hypothesis that drugs that reprogram (normalize) the epigenome, will block the inappropriate activation or silencing of DNA, thus normalizing gene expression. If this occurs, it will lead to improved outcomes for patients who do not respond to treatment.

Read more…