Bone Scan


A bone scan takes pictures of the bones to see if there is a tumor or infection present. A special dye called a radioactive isotope, or tracer, is given through an IV. This tracer contains a small amount of radiation, about the same amount as an x-ray. The tracer travels to the spots in the bones that are not normal. The scanner can then detect and take pictures of the areas where there may be tumor activity. Bone scans to not hurt.


Your child will need to lie still during this test.

  • It may take up to an hour to take the pictures.
  • Some children may need sedation (medicine that makes you sleepy) to be able to lie still for the whole test.
  • Some children feel closed-in when the scanner passes over their body.

Childhood Cancer

Medical Information

Research

Coping with Cancer

Get Involved

About Us