CureSearch for Children's Cancer Supports "Creating Hope Act" at Childhood Cancer Summit


CureSearch for Children's Cancer is pleased to show its support for the Creating Hope Act, which was introduced in the House of Representatives today (Sept. 23) following the Second Annual Childhood Cancer Summit on Capitol Hill. Sponsored by Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-NC), Rep. Sue Myrick (R-NC), and Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), the legislation incentivizes pharmaceutical companies to develop drugs specifically for children with cancer.

 
Panelists at the Second Annual Childhood Cancer Summit on Capitol Hill on Sept. 23 included Nancy Goodman, Founder and Executive Director of Kids v Cancer; Ron Portman, MD, Development Lead, Pediatric Center of Excellence, Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS); Eugenie Kleinerman, MD, Head of the Division of Pediatrics at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center; Peter Adamson, Chair of the Children’s Oncology Group; and Congressman Mike Kelly (R-PA). Congressmen Michael McCaul (R-TX) and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) hosted the Summit. They are co-chairs of the House Childhood Cancer Caucus.

At the press conference prior to the Summit, John Lehr, President and CEO of CureSearch, thanked Kids v Cancer Founder Nancy Goodman for her vision and determination in spearheading the bill. "I've been behind Nancy since she first shared the idea of this bill with me two years ago," said Lehr. "The Creating Hope Act is a step in the right direction, and that is why CureSearch for Children's Cancer supports this act. We are grateful to all the members of Congress working to ensure ongoing research and drug development for children with cancer."

Goodman, who held up a framed photo of her son while she spoke, told her very personal reason for initiating the Creating Hope Act. "I am here today because my son, Jacob, died 2 ½ years ago of a pediatric brain cancer.  Jacob was a beautiful 8-year-old boy with red hair and a brilliant, kind smile when he was diagnosed," said Goodman. "Two weeks after Jacob’s diagnosis, Jacob's doctors knew the drugs they intended to give him were not likely to work. Yet they continued to use them because there were no alternatives.  There have been no material changes in the treatment of Jacob’s form of cancer in decades."

Only one drug specifically for children with cancer has been brought to market in the last 20 years. Currently, children with cancer are treated with modified dosages of drugs developed for adults. "We can do better," said Goodman.

Hundreds of children's cancer advocates from across the country filled the new Capitol Visitors Center Auditorium in Washington, D.C. for the Summit. Co-chaired by Childhood Cancer Caucus founders Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX) and Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), the Summit brought together parents, children, legislators, physicians, and children's cancer organizations to discuss the future of drug development for children’s cancer.

A similar version of the Creating Hope Act was introduced in the Senate in March 2011 by Bob Casey (D-PA) and Scott Brown (R-MA).

Shelby Hammond
Communications Manager
Email Shelby
(240) 235-2205



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